Dragonflies and Damselfies

Over the last couple weeks we have been seeing large numbers of dragonflies and damselflies in the wetlands. Members of the insect order Odonata, there are more than 5,000 species and 23 families worldwide. In BC, there are 87 species known to occur. In general, dragonflies are larger, faster and most land with their wings spread. Damselflies are generally smaller, slower flying, and partially or fully close their wings when landing.

Numerous incidental observations have resulted in the start of a decent species list, along with some great photos. Below are a few of the species observed so far.

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Emerald spreadwing (Lestes dryas)

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Whitefaced meadowhawk (Sympetrum obtrusum)

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Striped meadowhawk (Sympetrum pallipes).

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Female common whitetail (Plathemis lydi).

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Male common whitetail (Plathemis lydi)

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Bluets mating (Enallagma sp.)

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Bluet (Enallagma sp.) – Potentially a Marsh Bluet. Close up of its face stuck on a sundew leaf.

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Four-spotted skimmer (Libellula quadrimaculata)

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